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Training ⑤

Organizational transformation for an agile telecom

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Different approaches illustrate the company and market conditions that guide the structure of teams around work, and the rapid benefits that follow.;

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Although more than 70 percent of companies report that agile online courses transformation is a top priority, we haven’t seen the extent of agile online courses adoption among operators that this level of interest would suggest. It’s puzzling. We know companies that go agile online courses are 50 percent likelier to outperform their competitors financially. We also know that agile online courses directly helps operators win four of their core battles: faster time to market, higher customer satisfaction, significant productivity improvements, and a transformed employee experience that improves talent attraction and retention.

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So, what is holding operators back?

We believe part of the answer is a lack of clarity about what “agility” actually means and how it plays out in practice within a specific company. The term is often used to connote a vague notion of being flexible. One executive explained his chronic lateness by saying he was just “being agile online courses with time.” Others associate the term with a type of software development or bean-bag chairs and flexible seating arrangements.

None of these definitions is accurate. What, then, is agility?

Think back to a crisis you were involved in or a time of urgent and decisive challenge. Maybe you were responding to an emergency in your community, serving in the military, or facing an impossible deadline at work. You assembled people from different backgrounds who were selected for their complementary skills, operated largely without hierarchy, and focused on a well-defined objective. These extraordinary achievements are often remembered as “peak experiences.”

Agile, in a nutshell, is about assembling the elements of that peak experience for every employee, every day, without the need for a crisis. Agility at scale embeds these elements in the very fabric of how things are done by providing the following:

  1. A very clear purpose, anchored in positive meaning
  2. A sharp definition of what success looks like
  3. Teams assembled with the skills required to succeed without reliance on others
  4. A cadence that fosters short bursts of tangible output and regular celebration of outcomes

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This is the core of agility—building organizations with hundreds of those great teams (Exhibit 1). However, great teams alone would result in chaos and lack of scale. The other critical piece is a strong backbone that supports these teams by providing a common purpose, cohesive culture, functional excellence, and standards, which in turn enable the processes and platforms that hold the company together.

Two approaches to agile online courses

In our work with multiple operators around the globe, we have seen two successful approaches to agile online courses emerge: agile online courses accelerators and enterprise-wide agile online courses (Exhibit 2). We’ll use examples of agile online courses in action at two different operators—Denmark’s TDC and New Zealand’s Spark—to demonstrate two emerging success patterns for how to organize teams around work. Both operators have reaped significant benefits through their transformation, including the four key benefits mentioned above, and attracted global attention in doing so. Telco executives from all over the world now visit both companies to learn how they changed long-held practices in favor of customer and operational excellence.

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Two approaches to going agile online courses have emerged.;
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The choice between the two approaches to agile online courses is driven by how agility can best unlock value in a particular company, the maturity of the organization, and the top management team’s convictions about starting small versus undertaking quick and comprehensive change. Common to both is the necessity for a company to be “all in” about agility—only the scope of initial change is different.

Next, we’ll see how these two approaches played out at the geographical antipodes, TDC and Spark.

TDC: ‘Digital first’ first

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The summer of 2016 was challenging for TDC, the leading Danish telco (see sidebar “About TDC”). The recent merger of its two main consumer brands had consolidated its B2C strategy and the newly appointed head of its B2C unit, Jaap Postma, had a long list of improvements to make in the new organization. TDC’s digital capabilities were at the top of it—market research and Postma’s own observations strongly suggested that the company was not meeting consumers’ rising expectations of online service.

Having witnessed the power of digital in his previous positions, Postma set it as a top priority and tasked Rune Keldsen, one of his trusted leaders with broad, relevant experience, to get this right. Postma and Keldsen quickly concluded that doing things the old way would not produce results fast enough. TDC had invested significant funds in digital for years, but these efforts always tended…

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